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5 things you need to know about Seantrel Henderson

Posted May 10, 2014

With the 237th pick in the 2014 NFL Draft, the Bills chose Seantrel Henderson of Miami. Get to know the new Bills OL with these five fast facts.

1) His upside is as big he is.

Henderson is well-documented as a natural athlete with enormous talent. If he develops that talent at the NFL level to fit his 6-7, 331 pound frame, he could be a force for the Bills.

2) He was a high school standout.

Henderson was the first lineman ever to win the USA TODAY’s High School Offensive Player of the Year Award, and was ranked as a five-star recruit and the number two in the nation in 2009. That year, he didn’t allow a single sack in 250 pass attempts at Cretin-Durham Hall High School in St. Paul, MN, and was recognized as the Minnesota Player of the Year en route to a state championship. He was the Junior of the Year on Rivals.com in 2008.

3) His dad raps about his football career.

According to the New York Times, his father Sean’s rap career was used in efforts to woo the family during the college recruitment process.

On Monday, the Ohio State running backs coach Doc Tressel sent an e-mail message to Henderson's father referring to a performance by the rappers Lil Wayne, Eminem and Drake during the Grammy Awards on Sunday. When Tressel, the older brother of Ohio State Coach Jim Tressel, visited the Hendersons in December, Seantrel made his father freestyle rap for him.”

When Seantrel verbally committed to USC before later choosing Miami, his dad wrote and rapped a song called Every Day Should Be Saturday.

4) He's a multi-talented athlete. 

He won the shot put, the discus throw and the 1,500 meter race in the 2004 Minnesota Junior Olympics, and was on the basketball and track teams at Cretin-Durham. At 6-7, we’re guessing he probably dunked over an opponent or two.

5) He played in the 2014 Senior Bowl.

After being named third-team All-ACC in his senior year, he was one of only three Hurricanes to be invited to the 2014 Senior Bowl. He helped anchor an offensive line that paved the way for 425.8 yards of offense per game and 33.8 points per game.